Last edited by Tejar
Friday, May 15, 2020 | History

2 edition of International pedigree book of snow leopards, Panthera uncia found in the catalog.

International pedigree book of snow leopards, Panthera uncia

International pedigree book of snow leopards, Panthera uncia

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  • 30 Currently reading

Published by Helsinki Zoo in Helsinki, Finland .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Snow leopard -- Congresses.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementeditor, Leif Blomqvist.
    ContributionsBlomqvist, Leif., Korkeasaaren eläintarha (Finland), International Snow Leopard Conference (1st : 1978 : Helsinki, Finland), International Snow Leopard Conference (2nd : 1980 : Zurich, Switzerland)
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQL737.C23 I54 1979
    The Physical Object
    Pagination2 v. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL3842145M
    ISBN 109517710860, 9517712162
    LC Control Number81157866

    Introduction. The snow leopard (Panthera uncia) has a long history in European zoos with the taxon exhibited for the first time in Antwerp Zoo in (Rieger, ).Although the first litter was born in Wroclaw Zoo in , it is safe to say that prior to the s, most snow leopards, not only in Europe but also in North America, imported from the wild did not survive long and only a handful Cited by: 1. The Snow Leopard Panthera uncia is uniquely adapted in many ways to life at high altitudes and extreme cold. Its lush fur (longest and densest of all the Panthera cats) is colored pale to smoke.

      To detect snow leopard sign, we trekked the region extensively, visiting all locations where we judged snow leopards and tahr to occur, employing the techniques of the Snow Leopard Information Management System (Jackson and Hunter ), a standardized approach widely used in snow leopard research. Sampling was conducted during the autumns of Cited by: Snow leopards—one of the world’s most elusive cats, are perfectly equipped to thrive in extreme, high-elevation habitats. Learn about these felines and how they expertly hunt agile prey. Snow.

      PROGRESSIVE encephalomyelopathy with cerebellar degeneration has been described in captive cheetahs (Palmer and others ) and in young domestic cats (Palmer and Cavanagh ).This case report describes the clinical and histopathological findings in a very similar condition affecting a young snow leopard (Uncia uncia) that had been born in a zoological park in eastern Cited by: 5. Snow leopards are more active at dawn and dusk. Attacks on humans are rare. Diet. Snow leopards are carnivores but also eat vegetation. They feed on wild sheep and goats, rodents, hares and birds. Breeding. Snow leopards mate in late winter. They start mating at 2 to 3 years old.


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International pedigree book of snow leopards, Panthera uncia Download PDF EPUB FB2

Results from the Snow Leopard Bibliography. of 15 records found matching your query. Behavioural analysis of solitary versus socially housed snow leopards (Panthera uncia), with the provision of simulated social contact. Applied Animal Behaviour Science, (): International Pedigree Book of Snow Leopards, 1: Schaller, G., R.

Junrang, Q. Mingjiang. Results from the Snow Leopard Bibliography. of 32 records found matching your query. International pedigree book of snow leopards, Panthera uncia Paperback – January 1, See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Paperback "Please retry" $ — $ Paperback $ 3 Used Format: Paperback.

Zoo Basel - The first breeding success with snow leopards: Ruedi, D. Bw The management of snow leopards in captivity at Howletts and Port Lympne: Nardelli, F. Bw Alfred Court and his performing snow leopards, Panthera uncia: Reynolds, R.J. Bw Tail functions in ounces, Uncia uncia: Rieger, I.

Get this from a library. International pedigree book of snow leopards, Panthera uncia / Vol. [Leif Blomqvist; Korkeasaaren eläintarha.;]. Jackson and G. Ahlborn, “A preliminary habitat International pedigree book of snow leopards model for the snow leopard (Panthera uncia),” in International Pedigree Book of Snow Leopards, vol.

Cited by: Known for their elusive nature, snow leopards are referred to by locals as “mountain ghosts.” As one of the most mysterious species on the planet, the snow leopard remains one of the least understood, and seen, of the big cats. Jackson, R. & Ahlborn, G.

() The role of protected areas in Nepal in maintaining viable populations of snow leopards. In International Pedigree Book of Snow Leopards Panthera uncia Volume 6 (ed. Blomqvuist, L.), pp. 51 – Helsinki Zoo, Helsinki, Finland. The snow leopard (Panthera uncia), also known as the ounce, is a large cat native to the mountain ranges of Central and South is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List because the global population is estimated to number less t mature individuals and is expected to decline about 10% by It is threatened by poaching and habitat destruction following infrastructural Class: Mammalia.

Food habits of the snow leopard Panthera uncia Schreber, ) in Baltistan, Northern Pakistan. Eur J Wildl Res 57(5), 5. Blomqvist L. First report on the snow leopard studbook (Panthera uncia) and the world register. Intl. Ped. Book of Snow Leopards 1, 6. Blomqvist L. International pedigree book of snow File Size: KB.

Prusten is a form of communicative behaviour exhibited by some members of the family Felidae. Prusten is also referred to as chuffing or chuffle (verb and noun). It is described as a short, low intensity, non-threatening vocalization. In order to vocalize a chuff, the animal's mouth is closed and air is blown through the nostrils, producing a breathy snort.

In high-altitude settings of Central Asia the Endangered snow leopard Panthera uncia has been recognized as a potential umbrella species. As a first step in assessing the potential benefits of snow leopard conservation for other carnivores, we sought a better understanding of the presence of other carnivores in areas occupied by snow leopards in China's Qilianshan National Nature by: 8.

When a Panthera Science Council member captured the first known photograph of the snow leopard in the early s, almost nothing was known about this elusive wild cat.

Even today. Snow leopards at Marwell Zoological Park: Knowles, J. Bw9: Keeping and breeding snow leopards at rare felids increasing centre, Nettuno, Italy: Nardelli, F. Bw New enclosures for snow leopards (Uncia uncia) at Krefeld Zoo: Vogt, P.

Bw Reproductive biology of the snow leopard, Panthera uncia. The beautiful smokey grey Snow Leopard (Panthera uncia) occurs in the high snowy mountains of Central as the 'ghost of the mountains' this elusive wild cat is difficult to study in its rugged terrain, and numbers are estimated between and  , “Snow Leopard (Uncia uncia) AZA Species Survival Plan® Yellow Program: Population Analysis and Breeding & Transfer Plan” (AZA Population Management Center, Chicago, ).

Blomqvist, International Pedigree Book for Snow leopards, Vol 9 (Helsinki Zoo, ).Cited by: 4. Der Europäische Leopard (Panthera pardus sickenbergi, Schütt ) / The European Leopard (Panthera pardus sickenbergi, Schütt ).

Gazelle - The. In L. Blomqvist (Ed.), International Pedigree Book of Snow Leopards (Panthera uncia) (pp. 71–84).

Helsinki, Finland: Helsinki Zoo. A survey of depredation and related wildlife-human conflicts in. Killing Incident of an Anatolian Leopard (Panthera pardus tulliana Valenciennes, ) in Turkey. By: Prof. Norman Ali Bassam Ali Taher Khalaf-Sakerfalke von Jaffa.

Article Reference. Introduction. Snow leopards (Panthera uncia) have long been reported as preying mainly on mountain ungulates and domestic livestock, supplemented by smaller mammals and gamebirds (e.g., Bannikov, ; Blanford,Heptner and Sludskii,Roberts, ; Schaller, ).Many subsequent reports have detailed individual prey species and aspects of dietary composition.The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) has had a long and successful history with snow leopards (Panthera uncia) at its New York-based zoos.

The Bronx Zoo was the first zoo in the Western Hemisphere to exhibit the species when it acquired a male inand snow leopards have been on display nearly continuously since then.Snow leopards (Panthera uncia) occur in rugged, high altitude regions of Central Asia, where they are endangered as a result of human induced factors including low prey densities and poaching.